4/23/07

WORK

How do we get coaches to understand that work does not equal training? Anyone can do work, but does it have a direction and a purpose. There are no magic workouts; a good workout must be in the context of the overall training program. One person’s fancy is another person’s folly. Understand principles, know your athletes, and understand the demands of the sport. Directed work is training. A well thought out training programs may not always produce predictable results but if it does not you will know why. Have a plan, execute the plan, evaluate and adjust it as necessary.

9 Comments:

At 4/23/07, 12:49 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Vern, It seems like some coaches are teaching/preaching sports specific exercise training in 6 days. I found pearls in principles that focus on training, education, knowledge and insight to utilize what I already have. It makes it easier for me to separate the training from the work.
I realized this constant movement helped me transfer training to work rather than working to train.

 
At 4/23/07, 1:27 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'm just niave enough to take a stabe at this question when mainly nonsense will prevail. My instinct tells me that, "How do we get coaches to understand that work does not equal training?" is not the right question to ask. What is the right question? I'm not sure I know. Do they need to understand? Could they just be guided and pushed in the right direction as long as they begin to see results? The difficult route would be to address movement in terms of the bodies response to force and the loading/unloading to generate a desired outcome such as jumping but I don't kow how many coaches would "get it". ON the other hand, do I need to understand a pair of sciccors from an engineers perspective in order to utilize them properly? The obvious answer is "No". Their is a risk with the "easy way" of giving a coach just enough ammo, if you will, to do some damage to an athlete with some potential. Perhaps coaches are the wrong audience. To create permanent change maybe the focus should be the youth that will either become athletes or future coaches. This is where the concept of the mentor will be crucial. Oh, and it helps to remember it's a journey NOT a destination.

Jonathan Hewitt ATC

 
At 4/23/07, 1:35 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

JH...I couldn't disagree with you.

Coaches sometimes see work as being productive. "See ?!? We're busy bees...we are working...look good the Queen bee is watching us...stay busy"
TC

 
At 4/23/07, 3:07 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

JH you might not have an issue using those scissors and don't want to know, but believe it or not some people do. Some very smart, successful people have this trouble and they never face it. They stay away with fear. The fear of looking silly in gym class because they can't kick, run or throw, swing, catch, hit. I believe the youth is a great place to start. But no one wants to work with them. It's a lot more fun hanging around the pro and college guy.

"No Journey's End"

 
At 4/23/07, 10:13 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"No Journey's End"
I agree with you and JH "youth is a great place to start" and "but no one wants to work with them". Ofcourse it's a lot more fun hanging around the pro and college guy, but even then there are coaches at the pros and collegiates level don't want to work with the lesser athletes.

Never Ending Journey Story

 
At 4/24/07, 12:38 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

The true professional learns that 'youth IS the place to start'...if one can teach a new movement pattern properly to the 'blank slate' of youth, that professional will be successful...it took me a while to realize that working with 10-13 year old boys/girls club soccer players was making me a much better collegiate/pro level coach...

On a related note...is soccer the only sport where one has to undergo 'formal' education, instruction, and levels of licensing in order to become a sport "coach"?...

Why don't other sports have some rudimentary, formal, education component?...youth sport is in dire need of competent sport skill coaches and athletic development professionals who understand science, physiology, psychology, and strategy...

Watching a "professional" physical education teacher (not one who unsuccessfully tries to 'herd cats by managing chaos' or just throws out the balls and says 'play' in class while s/he reads the newspaper) lead a class of K-3 students is a magical experience...I wish I had those skills...

TC = I miss our conversations...

Bekk

 
At 4/24/07, 12:12 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Bekk, From the looks of it, USA Hockey has a great coaching development program. Hockey is organized chaos. Two sports no one watches soccer and hockey.

 
At 4/25/07, 8:35 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Bekk, do you know why no one watches soccer and hockey?
Because it is not glamorous as football, basketball and baseball!!

Here is the $64,000 question, other than being a cultural sport, why MLS doesn't do well in USA?

Tee to the Cee

 
At 4/25/07, 9:53 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Tee to the Cee
Major League Soccer is the retirement ground for English Premier League, German Bundesliga, Spanish Primera Liga, Dutch Eredivisie, French Ligue 1 and Italian Serie A.

 

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